Throwback Thursday: Getting Ready for Take Off (Part 3)

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AnetLau
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Joined: 2020-06-24 1:56

Indoor Fountain by Erik Boelen

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Indoor Fountain by Erik Boelen

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Indoor Fountain by Erik Boelen

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Indoor Fountain by Erik Boelen


The oddest looking thing we printed was submitted by Erik Boelen from the Mimics team. Erik never designed something in a design software from scratch, but he liked the challenge and started to play around with SketchUp. He worked a number of evenings in SketchUp and lost track of time every time. It was printed in ABS and perfectly fitted his Billy bookshelf. Without realizing, he might have just come up with a quirky IKEA hack.


Armillary Sphere by Patricia Lopes


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Armillary Sphere by Patricia Lopes

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Armillary Sphere by Patricia Lopes


As a Portuguese girl living abroad, research engineer Patricia Lopes, wanted to create an object that symbolized her country. Since the rooster was a bit too kitsch, she decided to design a far more visually appealing and technologically demanding symbol: the armillary sphere.

The armillary sphere represents the celestial space and was used as an astronomical instrument by the Portuguese discoverers. It is currently part of the Portuguese flag. Being fascinated by astronomy, this seemed a good way to start. But how do you create a modern design based on such an old object? Well, she found inspiration in one of her favorite artists: Escher. The result was an intertwined set of spheres.

The final touch was an excerpt from “Os Lusíadas”; an epic poem about the history of Portugal. Roughly translated, it says “It shall be spread and sung in the Universe. If such a deed can be described in verse”.


Created by Franky in i.materialise.com


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